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ESPC awarded at Wright-Patterson AFB

A C-5 Galaxy flies over the Wright Brothers Memorial, which overlooks the main runway at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Wright-Patterson is the site of the newest Air force energy saving performance contract, which was awarded to Johnson Controls March 24. (Photo courtesy National Park Service)

A C-5 Galaxy flies over the Wright Brothers Memorial, which overlooks the main runway at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Wright-Patterson is the site of the newest Air force energy saving performance contract, which was awarded to Johnson Controls March 24. (Photo courtesy National Park Service)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

The Air Force Installation Contracting Agency, or AFICA, awarded an energy saving performance contract, or ESPC, at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, March 24. 
The $7.7 million project to reduce energy use through energy conservation measures, or ECMs, was awarded to Johnson Controls Government Systems. Construction for the project is slated to begin mid-April.

“Out of 106 buildings included in the original scope of the ESPC, Johnson Controls identified ECMs in 75 buildings,” said Morgan Hurst, AFCEC ESPC project manager. “These ECMs will contribute towards Wright-Patterson realizing its energy conservation and renewable energy goals.”

Johnson Controls proposed five major ECMs: chiller plant upgrades, energy management control system upgrades, interior and exterior lighting upgrades, mechanical pipe insulation and water conservation upgrades.

“The Wright Patterson energy team is always pursuing the best ECMs in all of our facilities,” said Michael Tibbs, 88th Civil Engineer Group energy manager. “This project accomplishes that mindset by touching numerous high energy facilities and will assist us meeting energy- and water-reduction goals.  Another key benefit will be lower utility costs while investing new energy efficient technology in numerous facilities.”

AFICA issued Johnson Controls a notice of intent to award December 2014. Prior to being awarded the contract, members of Johnson Controls provided a comprehensive audit and analysis of the buildings included in the project’s scope to discover opportunities for maximum energy and water savings.

Under the ESPC model, ESCOs compete to finance, design, construct and manage energy projects, and maintain the systems long-term. ESPCs range from 10 years to a maximum of 25 years, with the Air Force paying the ESCO back over the term of the contract from cost savings garnered by the energy efficiency improvements they make.