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Bioenvironmental: Protecting our Airmen

Senior Airman Tyler Kim, bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron, recently demonstrated how to gear up at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England. A Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus is used to provide breathable air in emergency situations that are dangerous to life or the health atmosphere. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

Senior Airman Tyler Kim, bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron, recently demonstrated how to gear up at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England. A Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus is used to provide breathable air in emergency situations that are dangerous to life or the health atmosphere. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

Senior Airman Tyler Kim; bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron; recently demonstrated how to gear up at Royal Air Force Lakenheath; England. A Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus is used to provide breathable air in emergency situations that are dangerous to life or the health atmosphere. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

Senior Airman Tyler Kim; bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron; recently demonstrated how to gear up at Royal Air Force Lakenheath; England. A Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus is used to provide breathable air in emergency situations that are dangerous to life or the health atmosphere. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

Senior Airman Enzo Guastavino, bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron, demonstrates how to use an ADM-300 radiation detection device at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Oct. 4, 2019. The ADM-300 can be used in all environments to detect Gamma and Beta radiation (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

Senior Airman Enzo Guastavino, bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron, demonstrates how to use an ADM-300 radiation detection device at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Oct. 4, 2019. The ADM-300 can be used in all environments to detect Gamma and Beta radiation (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

Senior Airman Enzo Guastavino, bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th AMDS, performs a chemical analysis test recently on the HazMatID Chemical Identifier at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England. The HazMatID Chemical Identifier takes less than one minute to analyze a small amount of unknown substance on to the diamond attenuated total reflection sensor and applies pressure with an integrated press for solid samples. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

Senior Airman Enzo Guastavino, bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th AMDS, performs a chemical analysis test recently on the HazMatID Chemical Identifier at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England. The HazMatID Chemical Identifier takes less than one minute to analyze a small amount of unknown substance on to the diamond attenuated total reflection sensor and applies pressure with an integrated press for solid samples. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhonda Smith)

ROYAL AIR FORCE LAKENHEATH, England --

The 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron Bioenvironmental Engineering flight are an integral part in completing the mission at the Liberty Wing because they ensure every office and shop have a healthy and safe workplace.

“Bioenvironmental provide a very important roll to the Air Force mission because they can determine any hazards that may exist, determine if our Airmen need personal protective equipment and make sure they have access to the needed equipment,” said Barry Wall, a 48th Fighter Wing occupational safety manager. “This is important because it protects our Airmen and ensure our Airmen go home the same way they arrived.”

To help accomplish this the bioenvironmental technicians use special equipment to sample water and detect radiation levels around the base to ensure safe working conditions in each shop.

They also have specific programs such has the respiratory protection program or the ventilation program to determine certain work conditions.

“Through our programs we make sure people are informed, trained and know how to protect themselves properly from the hazards or contaminates they may come across while working,” said Senior Airman Enzo Guastavino, bioenvironmental technician assigned to the 48th AMDS. “For instance the ventilation program ensures Airmen don’t get sick by providing proper ventilation for breathing.”

Their main focus is preventative medicine, which includes stopping any kind of sickness from happening by making sure everyone is following the proper practices and procedures in the workplace.

“How would we know those airborne hazards exist if they didn’t complete air sampling, or how would we know an F-15 or F-35 causes noise damage if they didn’t complete those assessments,” said Wall. “There would be a massive impact without bioenvironmental because we wouldn’t be able to ensure the safety of our Airmen.”

By identifying potential workplace hazards and providing procedures and equipment for potential hazards, bioenvironmental plays a vital role in the Liberty Wing’s ability to execute the mission because they protect the Airmen.